Dashlane Review 2021: Pricing & Features

Dashlane is a password management software that’s popular for business and personal uses alike. The company was founded in 2009, and the first software edition was released in 2012. Like many other password managers, Dashlane makes it easy for users to create new passwords and store existing ones in a secure vault. Internet security best practices mandate unique credentials for each online account; doing so would be impossible without a solid password manager like Dashlane.

Notable Dashlane features: admin controls and extras

Dashlane offers a number of features that outshine other top password management solutions like 1Password and Sticky Password. From an administrative perspective, Dashlane has mass deployment and remote offboarding capabilities that help you take care of granting or revoking access permissions in just a few clicks. You can also set up compromised password alerts that will proactively look for leaked passwords or vulnerable accounts across your company.

Your employees will love the unique bonus features Dashlane offers as well. These include a free premium personal or family plan for each user, with a Smart Spaces feature that keeps personal information separate from work accounts. Each user also has access to a free VPN to use when connecting to public Wi-Fi, and an Identity Dashboard that scans the dark web for potential fraud.

Dashlane advantages: security, UX, and SSO

Compared to other leading password managers like LastPass and OneLogin, Dashlane has a unique advantage: it’s never been hacked. This software uses patented security architecture with 256-bit encryption, plus built-in two factor authentication. Competitors may advertise their best-in-class security, but Dashlane has a clean track record to back it up.

The Dashlane developers also thought about how users interact with the software from every angle, making the streamlined UX a big draw. The mobile design is consistent across platforms and feels like a natural extension of the desktop app and web interface.

Plus, Dashlane supports SAML provisioning and SAML-based single sign-on (SSO) for Business customers. This means you can strengthen your security posture across all of your applications and reduce the number of accounts your employees need to keep up with.

Dashlane disadvantages: authentication and affordability

On the other hand, you might need to look elsewhere for certain features that Dashlane doesn’t offer. For example, Dashlane doesn’t support biometric authentication or passwordless authentication, so an alternative like LastPass or Okta might be a better fit if you’re looking for a solution that offers those features.

Additionally, Dashlane isn’t the most affordable option on the market. There are only two options—Team and Business—that come at higher price points than most other business-grade password managers. The bonus features are great, but you may want to look for a more basic tool if cost is your biggest priority.

Dashlane pricing

Dashlane comes in two different editions:

  • Team: $5/user/month
  • Business: $8/user/month

There are two primary differences between these two editions. First, the Business plan offers SAML-based SSO and SAML-provisioning, whereas the Team plan only offers the latter. This is important if you want an easy way to implement SSO across your organization.

Second, the Team plan offers a free premium personal plan, so the user can manage their professional and private account details from the same platform. The Business plan takes this a step further by offering each user a free premium family plan, so a user’s entire family can benefit from having a password manager as well.

Read next: Best Password Managers & Tools for 2021

Kaiti Norton
Kaiti Norton is a Nashville-based Content Writer for eSecurity Planet, Webopedia, and Small Business Computing. She is passionate about helping brands build genuine connections with their customers through relatable, research-based content.

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