According to a recent FBI job posting, the Bureau is planning to hire a new team of FBI Cyber Special Agents.

“The FBI seeks highly talented, technically trained individuals who are motivated by the FBI's mission to protect our nation and the American people from the rapidly evolving cyber threat," Robert Anderson, Jr., executive assistant director for the FBI's Criminal, Cyber, Response, and Services Branch, said in a statement. "What we want are people who are going to come and be part of a team that is working different very complex types of investigations and to utilize their skillsets in that team environment."

"Cyber agents will be integrated into all the different violations that we work," Anderson added. "So whether it’s a counterterrorism or counterintelligence investigation, they could be the lead agent in the case."

Prospective agents must be between the ages of 23 and 37, must pass a physical fitness test, and must have what the FBI describes as "a wealth of experience in computers and technology," including backgrounds in computer programming and security, database administration, malware analysis, digital forensics and/or ethical hacking.

All applicants must either qualify under the Computer Science/Information Technology Entry Program (which requires that they have a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering or a major related to computers or information technology, or have a CCNP or CCIE certification along with an unrelated bachelor's degree), or have managed a corporate network; installed and maintained server operating systems; established and maintained an ISP; maintained and monitored performance on a TCP/IP or other protocol network; or maintained and performance tuned servers or Internet Information Services.

"Cyber permeates every aspect of what we do, whether it's counterterrorism, criminal investigations, or traditional cyber attacks, as we’ve seen in the recent past," Anderson said. "That’s why these type of people are so important to get into the pipeline and come into our organization."

The FBI announcement notes that the Bureau already has a lengthy track record in fighting cybercrime, including a May 2014 crackdown on more than 100 distributors of the Blackshades malware and a June 2014 takedown of the GameOver Zeus botnet.

More recently, the FBI warned of an increase in insider threats from disgruntled employees, and issued a warning to U.S. companies of destructive malware attacks like the recent breach at Sony Pictures. Earlier in 2014, the FBI issued a confidential report to retailers noting that approximately 20 data breaches had already used similar malware to that used against Target and Neiman Marcus.

According to Anderson, the Bureau is planning to hire several cyber agents as soon as possible.

"It's an area where the FBI and the whole U.S. government will be looking for this talent for years to come," he said.

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