Alci Bonannee, 36, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., has been found guilty of running an identity theft tax fraud scheme from December 2010 to June 2012, during which approximately 2,000 fraudulent tax returns were submitted to the IRS seeking $11 million in refunds, of which several million dollars were deposited into bank accounts controlled by Bonannee and her co-conspirators, who then withdrew the money in cash.

"Law enforcement officers searched Bonannee's home and found a notebook and folder containing more than 1,000 names, dates of birth and Social Security numbers belonging to identity theft victims, court records related to the case show," writes The South Florida Sun-Sentinel's Ihosvani Rodriguez. "Bonannee was convicted Monday of one count of conspiracy to defraud the government, nine counts of filing false claims in violation, nine counts of aggravated identity theft and fourteen counts of wire fraud, according to federal prosecutors."

"According to testimony and evidence presented at trial, the defendant filed a large percentage of these fraudulent returns from her house in Fort Lauderdale, from her friends’ houses in Broward County and from a hotel in Charlotte, North Carolina," the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Florida said in a statement. "The defendant filed many of these fraudulent returns using compromised personal identification information obtained from a nurse at a local hospital."


Bonannee, who will be sentenced on April 26, 2013, faces a maximum sentence of 351 years in prison.