The Washington Post's Peter Finn reports that federal investigators "have increased pressure on current and former senior government officials suspected of involvement" in leaks regarding the development of the Stuxnet malware.

"The FBI and prosecutors have interviewed several current and former senior government officials in connection with the disclosures, sometimes confronting them with evidence of contact with journalists, according to people familiar with the probe," Finn writes. "Investigators, they said, have conducted extensive analysis of the e-mail accounts and phone records of current and former government officials in a search for links to journalists."

"It’s believed that only a small number of US and Israeli officials knew about Stuxnet," writes Softpedia's Eduard Kovacs. "Figures from a 2010 letter sent by the Justice Department to a Senate committee showed that intelligence agencies had notified the DOJ regarding 183 information leaks. 14 suspects were identified as a result of 26 investigations."

"Glenn Greenwald at The Guardian has written an extensive and thoughtful post about how the Stuxnet leaks investigation demonstrates, in his opinion, the Obama administration's devotion to maintaining and increasing its secrecy power. ... The worry is that we are all suffering loss of privacy due to increasingly sophisticated and ever-more-intrusive surveillance techniques," writes Sophos' Lisa Vaas. "But what's particularly alarming is the idea of would-be whistleblowers being intimidated to the extent that they might not fight for transparency into the government's actions."