As part of #OpSaveTheArctic, members of Anonymous recently targeted oil companies Exxon Mobil, Shell, BP, Gazprom and Rosneft in an effort to protest their plans to drill for oil in the Arctic.

"[The] hacker collective Anonymous (or an apparent affiliate, CyberZeist) added its own efforts to the struggle, hacking into Exxon Mobil’s systems and using employees' e-mail IDs to sign Greenpeace’s petition against Arctic drilling," The Arctic Institute's Tom Fries reports.

In a statement published along with the Exxon Mobil e-mail data, the hackers wrote, "The energy companies that caused the Arctic to melt in the first place are looking to profit from the disappearing ice. They want to open up a new oil frontier to get at a potential 90 billion barrels of oil. That’s a lot of money to them, but it’s only three years’ worth of oil to the world. Previously classified government documents say dealing with oil spills in the freezing waters is 'almost impossible' and inevitable mistakes would shatter the fragile Arctic environment.We’ve seen the extreme damage caused by the Exxon Valdez and Deepwater Horizon disasters - we cannot let this happen in the Arctic."

"From Shell, the hacktivists leaked around 20 user email addresses and associated clear text passwords," E Hacking News reports. "BP Global's databases appear to contain more information, over 400 email addresses and password hashes being published. Around 200 credential sets were stolen by the hackers from Gazprom and approximately 80 from Rosneft. For some of the companies, database access details were also made available."