According to the results of a recent Ponemon Institute survey of more than 700 IT and IT security professionals at enterprises and government agencies with an average of 12,000 employees, 61 percent of respondents said their organizations have suffered a cyber attack in the past two years that threat intelligence could have prevented, and 71 percent said there has to be a better way to exchange threat intelligence than exists today.

The survey, entitled "Exchanging Cyber Threat Intelligence: There Has to Be a Better Way," was sponsored by IID.

"What was clear in our findings is that businesses and government agencies know that exchanging cyber threat intelligence will help secure the Internet more so than any other method or technology," Larry Ponemon, chairman and founder of the Ponemon Institute, said in a statement. "Yet what is really confounding is that while most of the people participating in the survey are clearly sharing cyberattack information, they know they aren’t doing it correctly or effectively."

Only 30 percent of survey respondents said they're satisfied or very satisfied with the way their organization obtains threat intelligence -- the primary challenges in doing so are that the information isn't timely, isn't categorized according to threat type or attacker, and is too complicated to ensure ease and speed of use.

And while 69 percent of respondents said threat intelligence becomes stale within seconds or minutes, more than half said they generally receive information in increments of days, weeks, or even months.

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