Following the discovery that PIN pads at 63 of its stores were compromised, Barnes and Noble is facing several class action lawsuits over its delay in informing customers about the breach.

"Back in September, the book retailer learned that the PIN pads from 63 stores had been used to skim customer payment card details," writes Softpedia's Eduard Kovacs. "The company only started alerting potential victims more than one month later, time in which the crooks had already started misusing the information they stole to make fraudulent transactions."

"On Friday, two Illinois residents, Jonathan Honor and Ray Clutts, jointly filed a class-action complaint on behalf of themselves and others similarly impacted by the breach, alleging that Barnes & Noble waited too long to notify customers and that it also failed to individually contact those whose information was stolen. ... Meanwhile, a week earlier, on Oct. 27 and Oct. 29, Illinois residents Elizabeth Nowak and Susan Winstead each filed individual class-action complaints as a result of the breach," writes SC Magazine's Danielle Walker.

"Claiming breach of an implied contract to protect that information and violation of Illinois consumer fraud laws, [Nowak] seeks class action -- or group -- status on behalf of anyone who swiped their card through one of the store’s PIN pads from Nov. 1, 2010, to now, plus unspecified money damages and three years of credit card monitoring services for class members," writes Businessweek's Andrew Harris.