A recent CounterTack survey of more than 100 information security executives at enterprises with revenues over $100 million has found that such companies aren't sufficiently prepared to detect and block advanced targeted attacks.

Almost half of survey respondents said their companies had been attacked within the past year, and on third of those that had been attacked said they lacked confidence in their organizations' ability to stop further attacks.

Fully 84 percent of respondents said their companies are vulnerable to advanced persistent threats targeting critical assets such as intellectual property.

"Fending off advanced persistent threats requires a big investment of time and expertise, but according to the survey, 44 percent of security executives said they lack the resources to fight such attacks," writes The Boston Globe's Hiawatha Bray.

"Thirty-six percent of respondents indicated that if an attacker got inside their perimeter defenses and into their networks, they would not be able to see or stop the attack," Infosecurity reports. "When asked to grade themselves at discovering in-progress attacks quickly enough to mitigate damage and prevent catastrophic loss, respondents were more likely to give themselves a 'C' versus an 'A.'"

"Some 80 percent of those polled believe that taking a more military-minded approach to the cyberwar could benefit business, according to CounterTack CEO Neal Creighton, whose firm released the poll Monday," writes CNN's Suzanne Kelly. "For Creighton, that means incorporating more military-style intelligence gathering into companies' cyberworld defenses."