The Chinese government says the country's Defense Ministry and China Military Online Web sites were hit by 144,000 cyber attacks a month last year, 62.9 percent of which came from the United States.

"Defense Ministry spokesman Geng Yansheng issued the accusation, and said that the Chinese military has never supported any hacking activity targeting the U.S.," writes BGR's Zach Epstein. "'Like other countries, China faces a serious threat from hacking and is one of the primary victims of hacking in the world,' Geng told reporters. 'Numbers of attacks have been on the rise in recent years.'"

"The Defense ministry also criticized a recent report that said U.S. intelligence officials determined that the president of the United States has the power to launch a pre-emptive strike if a major cyber attack is imminent, as well as a planned expansion of 'network warfare units,'" writes PCMag.com's Chloe Albanesius. "Those plans 'are not conducive to the joint efforts of the international community to enhance network security. We hope that the United States [is] made to explain and clarify,' according to the translated statement."


"The allegations from Beijing come hot on the heels of a recent report from U.S. security firm Mandiant, linking the Chinese army to cyberattacks against the United States," writes CNET News' Lance Whitney. "Citing digital forensic evidence, investigators for Mandiant said they found an office building just outside of Shanghai that housed People's Liberation Army Unit 61398 and traced a Chinese hacking group to that location."

"The hacking dispute adds to diplomatic tension between China and the US, already strained by Chinese suspicion about Washington's motives in Asia and arguments over issues from trade to human rights," The Guardian reports.