Members of Team GhostShell recently published 2.5 million records that it claims were stolen from "governmental, educational, academical, political, law enforcement, telecom, research institutes, medical facilities, large corporations (both national and international branches) in such fields as energy, petroleum, banks, dealerships and many more."

"Team GhostShell said it was leaking the data in protest against the Russian government's willingness to plough its revenues into espionage 'even though the country is going through hard times and many people are starving,'" writes The Register's John Leyden. "In a notice accompanying the release, in which it describes Russia as 'a state of tyranny and regret,' the group boasts that it is only releasing a sample of the huge cache of data it has pwned."

"The records contain a variety of information -- names, emails, passwords, IP addresses, and even CVs, but it still remains to be seen whether the leaked data is genuine," writes Help Net Security's Zeljka Zorz.

"Email accounts listed are on major Russian domains, including,,,, as well as the Russian government’s," writes The Next Web's Emil Protalinski. "The big email providers are also present, however: there are many Gmail, Hotmail, and Yahoo email addresses."

"Team Ghostshell released thousands of records last month too when the group announced it had published 120,000 records from some of the world’s top universities," writes Threatpost's Christopher Brook. "That leak, dubbed 'Project WestWind,' sought to 'raise awareness towards the changes made in today's education,' spilling student and faculty email addresses, passwords and IDs."