Members of Anonymous Philippines recently defaced government and private Web sites to protest a new cybercrime law.

"Front pages of websites belonging to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP), the Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System (MWSS), and American Chamber of Commerce in Philippines were replaced by a logo belonging to 'Anonymous Philippines' and a statement on a black background," writes ABS-CBN News' Jojo Malig. "Websites belonging to the Philippine Anti-Piracy Team, the Department of Environment in Region 3, the Institute for Development and Econometric Analysis, and the Department of Health's Anti-Smoking program were also defaced."

"Those who hacked the BSP website identified themselves as 'busabos,' 'Anonymous Butuan,' 'PrivateX,' '#pR.is0n3r,' 'Lo0p th3 Lo0p,' 'l4stl00k,' 'Blackrain,' and 'Anonymous Manila,'" GMA News reports.

"'The Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 is the most notorious act ever witnessed in the cyber-history of the Philippines … It is just so disappointing that our government, in adopting our 80-year-old antiquated libel laws to the Cybercrime Law, again seems to have retarded our march with the rest of the world with respect to giving full force to the people’s freedom of expression,' read the group’s message over the hijacked sites," Manila Standard Today reports.

"The hackers said the law 'effectively ends' freedom of expression in the Philippines and called for a revision of the law that punishes online libel," Rappler.com reports.

"The Cybercrime Prevention Act was the second Information Communication Technology-related bill that the Aquino administration signed this year. ... As of Thursday, three petitions have so far been filed before the Supreme Court against the anti-cybercrime law," Sun.Star reports. "The groups opposing the law questioned its constitutionality, saying it runs counter to a myriad of rights guaranteed under the Constitution, including freedom of expression, due process, equal protection and privacy of communications."