Greek police recently arrested a man for allegedly stealing the personal data of as many as 9 million Greek citizens.

"The 35-year old computer programmer was also suspected of attempting to sell the 9 million files containing identification card data, addresses, tax ID numbers and license plate numbers," writes Reuters' Renee Maltezou. "Some files contained duplicate entries, police said."

"The source of the leaked data remains unclear, although an insecure government server is one likely possibility," writes The Register's John Leyden. "The investigation into the mystery privacy breach remains ongoing and further arrests may follow. 'We are investigating what the source of the data was and how they were used by the man arrested, and also the possibility of him providing them to someone else,' police spokesman Christos Manouras told reporters."


"The investigation began after an employee at the data protection authority notified police that someone appeared to have a large number of digital files containing personal data, the head of financial and electronic crimes police Dimitris Georgatzis said," writes Greek Reporter's Andy Dabilis. "The suspect was tracked down through the internet, and computer equipment seized from his house during a search, Georgatzis added."

"A similar data theft was reported in Israel a year ago, when a government contractor stole files from the country's Population Registry, ultimately affecting the personal data of the entire population," notes Dark Reading's Tim Wilson.