The new Twitter feed @NeedADebitCard, launched in late May with the tag line "Please quit posting pictures of your debit card, people," retweets posts that include images of debit and credit cards.

"Apparently, there are some people posting pictures of their debit and credit cards online. These images show the names, card numbers, expiration dates, and in some cases, the security code," writes's Fahmida Y. Rashid. "There is enough information exposed, voluntarily by the card owners themselves, for anyone to commit fraud."

"The account hasn’t tweeted anything original; instead, there are roughly a couple of retweets of other users per day, suggesting a serious dearth of basic privacy literacy among many Internet users," writes The Los Angeles Times' Matt Pearce. "@NeedADebitCard falls in line with privacy-shaming sites such as, a privacy awareness site that aggregated and streamed FourSquare check-ins of people posting when they were away from home."

"It’s difficult to settle on one feeling when looking at the @NeedaDebitCard page -- on one hand, you almost feel sorry for people, getting their financial information aggregated to a page without their consent," writes The Inquisitr's Kim LaCapria. "On the other, it’s publicly available information -- in fact, it’s information they put out into the public sphere, perhaps not realizing that an image of their debit card is as good as someone having possession of their debit card for many applications."

"A quick look through the posts indicated that the majority of those posting their debit cards were young adults or teens," writes Forbes' Reuven Cohen. "As a parent, I’d suggest speaking to your children about common sense Internet privacy practices, or risk your child becoming yet another Internet identity fraud victim."