Researchers have demonstrated a method of hacking the electronic voting machines that will be used by millions of Americans in the 2012 U.S. presidential election.

"The attack on the Diebold AccuVote TS electronic voting machine, which is now marketed by Election Systems & Software, relies on a small circuit board that an attacker inserts between the components connecting the touch screen of the device to its microprocessor," writes The Register's Dan Goodin. "The $10.50 card then controls the information flowing into the machine's internal processor, allowing attackers to change votes with almost no visible sign of what's taking place."

"In a video demonstration, researchers from the Vulnerability Assessment Team at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois showed how the card could be used to briefly kill the power to the voting machine's touch screen to temporarily black out what's displayed so voters can't see their choices being modified," Goodin writes.


Go to "Diebold e-voting hack allows remote tampering" to read the details.

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