SecureState recently released the full source code of its Termineter framework, a platform for testing the security of smart meters.

"Power companies can use the framework to identify and validate internal flaws that leave them susceptible to fraud and significant vulnerabilities, the company says, adding that users must have general knowledge of the meter's internal workings in order to use Termineter proficiently," Renew Grid reports.

"Security consultancy InGuardians had planned to publicly release details of a similar tool called OptiGuard at the Shmoocon security conference a few months ago," writes Computerworld's Jaikumar Vijayan. "The company however pulled the talk at the last minute in after a unnamed smart grid vendor and several utilities expressed concern that the tool would allow hackers to exploit vulnerable smart meters."

"Spencer McIntyre, a member of SecureState's Research & Innovation Team, says his company basically lucked out and wasn't pressured by vendors worried about the release today of his so-called Termineter tool, which he will demonstrate next week at the BSides conference in Las Vegas," writes Dark Reading's Kelly Jackson Higgins. "'We got really lucky, I guess. We worked with power and utility vendors,' he says. 'The [utility] client we worked with has been working with us to release this tool.'"

"The security of smart meters and utilities in general have drawn a lot of attention recently," notes Threatpost's Dennis Fisher. "California last year became one of the first states to issue regulations for the security of smart meters. The rules govern the security of the data on the meters as well as the privacy of it and who can access the data and for what purposes."