Huawei is offering unrestricted access to its source code and hardware in order to reassure potential customers that are worried about national security issues.

"Huawei Australia Chairman John Lord said that the company would allow independent examination of its source code to assuage security concerns, and told an audience at Australia's National Press Club ... that 'We sincerely hope that in Australia, we do not allow sober debate on cyber security to become distorted the way it has in the US,'" writes Ars Technica's Sean Gallagher.

"'Huawei is proposing the establishment of a National Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, to test the security credentials of technologies being implemented into critical infrastructure projects,' Mr. Lord said," writes The Australian Financial Review's David Ramli.

"The company was barred from bidding on Australian contracts for the network this year," writes Nextgov's Dawn Lim. "It was also hit by charges from the U.S. House Intelligence Committee of being a security threat to the United States because its gear could be used to spy on sensitive networks for China."

"Huawei also pitched the concept to US lawmakers during the Committee on Intelligence's investigation of the company," notes Sophos' Lisa Vaas. "The committee's report rejected the proposal on the grounds that Huawei's equipment is too complex, making it too difficult to assess whether the goods could be manipulated."