According to the results of a recent survey of 3,200 university graduate level employees aged 21 to 32 across 20 countries, 51 percent of respondents said they would contravene any corporate policy that banned the use of personal devices at work or for work purposes (h/t Softpedia).

The survey, sponsored by Fortinet and conducted by Vision Critical, also found that 36 percent of respondents who use their own personal cloud storage accounts for work purposes said they would break any rules intended to stop such activity -- and similarly, 48 percent said they would violate any policy aimed at curbing the use of emerging technologies such as Google Glass and smart watches at work.

Fully 89 percent of respondents said they have a personal account with at least one cloud storage service, and 70 percent of those who have such accounts have used them for work purposes. Twelve percent of that group admit to storing work passwords on those accounts, 22 percent store critical documents like contracts or business plans, and 33 percent store customer data.


Still, more than 55 percent of respondents said they had experienced a cyber attack on a personally owned PC or laptop, and 19 percent had experienced an attack on a smartphone.

Fourteen percent of respondents said they wouldn't tell their employer if a personal device they used for work became compromised.

"The study highlights the greater challenge IT managers face when it comes to knowing where corporate data resides and how it is being accessed," Fortinet vice president of marketing John Maddison said in a statement. "There is now more than ever a requirement for security intelligence to be implemented at the network level in order to enable control of user activity based on devices, applications being used and locations."

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