According to a recent report from Context Information Security entitled "Tablets -- A Hard Pill to Swallow" [PDF file], the BlackBerry PlayBook is the only tablet that currently offers a "workable" BYOD solution.

"[The study] looked at Apple's iPad, Samsung's Galaxy Tab and RIM's BlackBerry PlayBook, and concluded the Samsung device was the least enterprise-ready of the trio," writes The Register's John Leyden. "While the iPad and BlackBerry PlayBook performed better, both still have security deficiencies -- including desktop software that fails to encrypt backups by default."

"It is difficult to ignore the growing presence of tablet computers in the home and workplace offering a blend of productivity, connectivity and physical freedom which has never been achieved before," Jonathan Roach, Principal Consultant at Context and author of the report, said in a statement. "The device format is perfect for social networking and creating and sharing documents, presentations and other content on-the-fly, but the same characteristics also present tough security challenges for organisations. Our research suggests that most tablet manufacturers still have a way to go before their products can deliver the high levels of security required for use in most corporate enterprises."

"Context found the PlayBook to be the most work-ready personal tablet of the three, due to its Bridge application's excellent support of barriers between work and personal profiles," writes TechNewsDaily's Ben Weitzenkorn. "Despite that security advantage, RIM only managed to ship 130,000 tablets last quarter. By contrast, Apple's wildly popular iPad sold more than 17 million units last quarter. Context found the iPad to be the second-most-secure device, citing its 'robust data protection and damage limitation facilities,' but said on its news page that the device was still vulnerable to jailbreak attacks and 'ineffective disk encryption unless a strong passcode policy is applied.'"