In a recent blog post, Zendesk CEO Mikkel Svane announced that a security breach had exposed the e-mail addresses of all users who had contacted Zendesk customers Tumblr, Twitter and/or Pinterest for support.

"Zendesk allows companies to outsource many of their customer service functions to it via software tools," writes Wired's Mat Honan. "It has more than 25,000 clients, according to its website."

"We’re incredibly disappointed that this happened and are committed to doing everything we can to make certain it never happens again," Svane wrote. "We’ve already taken steps to improve our procedures and will continue to build even more robust security systems. We will continue to diligently work with our affected customers to mitigate any impact. We are also completely committed to working with authorities to bring anyone involved to justice and make certain we fully understand what happened."

"Things could be worse: passwords weren't revealed, says Zendesk," writes TG Daily's Emma Woollacott. "It appears that the only data stolen was email addresses and subject lines, although it's possible some phone numbers were exposed too. Subject lines may, though, be revealing in the case of Tumblr users, who are likely to have included their blog addresses in emails to customer support."

"None of the official emails or [postings] from Zendesk or its clients indicated how the intruders got into Zendesk's systems, or how many individuals' email addresses had been exposed," writes TechNewsDaily's Paul Wagenseil.

"Given the number of attacks which have occurred this week, now may be a good time to review your security policies and even change your passwords," writes redOrbit's Michael Harper. "A good first step to a secure online lifestyle is to have multiple, strong passwords for each and every online profile that you maintain, taking extra care with those accounts in which you store your credit card information, such as Amazon, eBay or iTunes."