The University of North Florida recently acknowledged that a database containing 23,246 people's names and Social Security numbers may have been breached. The database contained information on people who applied for university housing between 1997 and 2011 -- and the university say the breach may have occurred as long ago as the spring of 2011.

"The University Police Department, in conjunction with Housing and Information Technology Services, is investigating this incident, UNF said," First Coast News reports. "The university is also reviewing systems and procedures in an effort to figure out how the data breach occurred."

"While the investigation didn’t turn up any evidence that any of the information was copied from the files, the university says it’s a possibility," writes WOKV's Gene Wexler. "Therefore, UNF is sending letters and email to the people who could have been affected by this breach of security. UNF is offering to cover to the costs of a one-year membership in a credit-protection program for those who could have been impacted."

"This is the second major data breach at the university in as many years," Infosecurity notes. "In October 2010, the university admitted to a data security breach that compromised personal information, including social security numbers, of more than 100,000 individuals, the First Coast News reported."

"Other universities have been affected by hackers more recently," notes The Florida Times-Union's Dan Scanlan. "The University of Nebraska identified an undergraduate student in May it says is responsible for breaking into a school database with information on more than 650,000 students, parents and employees ... [and] in January, Arizona State University shut down its web services after someone downloaded an encrypted file containing user names and passwords of an unknown number of students, faculty and staff, according to the school."