New Zealand-born hacker Barnaby Jack died on July 25, 2013 at the age of 35, days before he was due to give a presentation on vulnerabilities in medical devices at Black Hat USA 2013 in Las Vegas.

Black Hat issued a statement that reads, in part, "Barnaby had the ability to take complex technology and intricate research and make it tangible and accessible for everyone to learn and grow from. Beyond his work in our industry, Barnaby was an incredibly warm hearted and welcoming individual with a passion for celebrating life. We all have a hilarious and upbeat story about Barnaby. He is truly a shining example of what we love about this community."

Jack was known for demonstrating a variety of critical flaws in medical devices, and for doing so in dramatic fashion, including vulnerabilities in pacemakers and insulin pumps -- as well as vulnerabilities in ATMs that could be leveraged to cause them to spit out cash.

Fellow hacker Tiffany Strauchs Rad told Reuters that Jack hacked a gold bullion dispensing machine at a casino in Abu Dhabi in 2010 with a hotel manager's permission -- but security intervened, and the American Embassy had to help resolve the misunderstanding.

"He would hack everything he touched," Rad said.

According to the Guardian, the San Francisco medical examiner's office has said it could be months before Jack's cause of death is announced, though no foul play is suspected.

A fund has been started to "address any needs that the family may have and allow them to choose the way in which they feel best honors their beloved son." Donations can be made here.