Members of Anonymous have threatened to take down Web sites linked to the upcoming Formula One Grand Prix in Montreal.

"According to Anonymous, the reasoning for the proposed computer hack is because the organisers of the F1 are to go ahead with a Grand Prix in a place that 'Amnesty International and other global human rights groups have declared human rights violators,'" writes TechRadar's Marc Chacksfield. "This is to do with Quebec's use of Special Law 78, which offers up stern regulations over demonstrations in the province -- meaning students who are found to be striking or demonstrating can expect heavy fines for having their say."

"The bill has drawn the ire of Montreal college students who have for months been protesting against proposed tuition hikes," writes SecurityNewsDaily's Matt Liebowitz. "As with widely publicized anti-government protests around the world, Anonymous is throwing its hat in the ring to oppose what it believes is an unjust law. 'We highly suggest that you join the boycott of the F1 in Montreal, and we certainly recommend that you do not purchase any tickets or merchandise online,' the group said. 'You have been warned.'"

"The global 'hacktivist' group successfully shut down the official Formula One website during the Grand Prix race in Bahrain last month, and posted a statement against the regime of King Hamad bin al-Khalifa, and the government crackdown on opposition groups," writes The Montreal Gazette's Jason Magder. "The race was unaffected, but Anonymous claims it accessed personal information, including credit card numbers that were stored on the F1 website, and dumped that information on the web. It has vowed to do the same with the Montreal event."